Privet

Privet

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Privet, Common privet | Ligustrum ovalifolium

Privet is a quick-growing, multi-stemmed hedging plant or shrub with attractive dark green leaves and white flowers in midsummer. It is semi-evergreen, meaning it should keep its leaves in the winter if it is mild but will drop some of its leaves in a cold winter.

Why plant Privet hedging?

  • Fast growing
  • Can be easily clipped to form neat hedges.
  • Very tough and reliable.
  • Can be grown in most sites (including dry shade, exposed and coastal sites) and most soils except waterlogged soils.
  • Can grow in full sun to partial shade.
  • Creates an effective screen and windbreak.
  • Tolerates pollution, so can be grown next to a busy road where it will also filter the noise.
  • Has attractive white flowers
  • Berries will benefit wildlife

How far apart should I plant Privet?

Pot-grown privet should be planted 45-60cm (1'6"-2ft) apart to form a dense hedge.

What type of soil will Privet grow in?

Most soils except waterlogged.

How tall and wide will Privet grow?

Ultimate size 3-4m (10-12ft) high and wide.

How fast will it grow?

Privet will grow between 45-60cm (1’6”-2’) a year under ideal conditions.

How often will I need to trim a Privet hedge?

Trim a Privet hedge at least once a year from May to August (just check there are no birds nesting in it before you trim). The more you cut it, the denser it becomes. If necessary, it can be cut back hard in April to reduce the size.

Additional information about Privet

Clusters of white flowers emerge in around July, followed by shiny black berries. If you have a pet stick insect, privet leaves are among its favourite foods. Privet is poisonous to livestock, so we do not recommend planting it near a field that contains cattle or sheep.

The many names of Privet

There are many other alternative common names including Oval Leaf privet, Garden privet, Korean privet and Californian privet.

Botany and origins

The botanical name of common privet is Ligustrum ovalifolium. It is a member of Oleaceae (Olive) family and is native to Japan and Korea.

The benefits of growing a Privet hedge

The flowers and berries attract wildlife. If grown near a busy road, a Privet hedge will reduce the traffic noise and block pollutants.

Alternatives to Privet hedging

Golden privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium ‘Aureum’) is another type with golden variegation in the leaves. Griselinia littoralis has slightly larger leaves that are a lighter green similar to the colour of a Granny Smith apple. Leylandii is a good alternative for filtering traffic pollution. Portuguese Laurel (Prunus lusitanica ‘Angustifolia’) has slightly larger leaves that are darker green.

Privet

Privet

Grid  List 

1 Item(s)

Grid  List 

1 Item(s)

Privet, Common privet | Ligustrum ovalifolium

Privet is a quick-growing, multi-stemmed hedging plant or shrub with attractive dark green leaves and white flowers in midsummer. It is semi-evergreen, meaning it should keep its leaves in the winter if it is mild but will drop some of its leaves in a cold winter.

Why plant Privet hedging?

  • Fast growing
  • Can be easily clipped to form neat hedges.
  • Very tough and reliable.
  • Can be grown in most sites (including dry shade, exposed and coastal sites) and most soils except waterlogged soils.
  • Can grow in full sun to partial shade.
  • Creates an effective screen and windbreak.
  • Tolerates pollution, so can be grown next to a busy road where it will also filter the noise.
  • Has attractive white flowers
  • Berries will benefit wildlife

How far apart should I plant Privet?

Pot-grown privet should be planted 45-60cm (1'6"-2ft) apart to form a dense hedge.

What type of soil will Privet grow in?

Most soils except waterlogged.

How tall and wide will Privet grow?

Ultimate size 3-4m (10-12ft) high and wide.

How fast will it grow?

Privet will grow between 45-60cm (1’6”-2’) a year under ideal conditions.

How often will I need to trim a Privet hedge?

Trim a Privet hedge at least once a year from May to August (just check there are no birds nesting in it before you trim). The more you cut it, the denser it becomes. If necessary, it can be cut back hard in April to reduce the size.

Additional information about Privet

Clusters of white flowers emerge in around July, followed by shiny black berries. If you have a pet stick insect, privet leaves are among its favourite foods. Privet is poisonous to livestock, so we do not recommend planting it near a field that contains cattle or sheep.

The many names of Privet

There are many other alternative common names including Oval Leaf privet, Garden privet, Korean privet and Californian privet.

Botany and origins

The botanical name of common privet is Ligustrum ovalifolium. It is a member of Oleaceae (Olive) family and is native to Japan and Korea.

The benefits of growing a Privet hedge

The flowers and berries attract wildlife. If grown near a busy road, a Privet hedge will reduce the traffic noise and block pollutants.

Alternatives to Privet hedging

Golden privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium ‘Aureum’) is another type with golden variegation in the leaves. Griselinia littoralis has slightly larger leaves that are a lighter green similar to the colour of a Granny Smith apple. Leylandii is a good alternative for filtering traffic pollution. Portuguese Laurel (Prunus lusitanica ‘Angustifolia’) has slightly larger leaves that are darker green.